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Spring Hope, Bailey water and sewer projects funded

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Several area cities and towns will benefit from millions in loans and grants for critical drinking water and wastewater projects.

Gov. Roy Cooper announced Wednesday that $166 million in funding to support 88 water and sewer improvement projects were approved last week.

• In Nash County, Bailey will receive $500,000 in principal forgiveness subsidies for the replacement of a sewer collection system from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund. Bailey will also receive a $981,500 grant for sewer collection system replacements in project funding from the wastewater state reserve.

• Spring Hope will receive $150,000 in funding for water asset inventory and assessment grant funding and also $150,000 in wastewater asset inventory and assessment grant funding.

• Sharpsburg, the municipality that straddles Wilson, Nash and Edgecombe counties, will receive $500,000 in principal forgiveness subsidies and a $951,234 loan for 2019 sanitary sewer improvements from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund.

• In Wilson County, the town of Lucama was awarded $500,000 in principal forgiveness subsidies and a $967,500 loan for sewer line replacement and pump station rehabilitation from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund.

• In Johnston County, Kenly will receive $1,998,672 in Community Development Block Grant infrastructure project funding to pay for sewer rehabilitation and replacement.

• Also in Johnston County, Clayton is receiving a $30 million loan for the Neuse River reclamation facility from the Community Development Block Grant program.

• In Pitt County, the town of Fountain will receive $372,000 in principal forgiveness subsidies and a $124,000 loan for water line replacement from the drinking water state revolving fund.

“All families across our state deserve clean water,” Cooper said in a news release. “Some water and sewer systems are over a hundred years old, and these funds will help communities meet their infrastructure challenges.”

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